Science for the Public Lectures

Most Recent Episode Science for the Public Science Literacy Series: 01/30/18

Dr. Sandro Galea discusses the numerous socio-economic factors that impact health. He also provides some comparisons between the cost of health and the state of health between the U.S. and other wealthy nations.

Episodes

Science for the Public Science Literacy Series: 01/30/18

Dr. Sandro Galea discusses the numerous socio-economic factors that impact health. He also provides some comparisons between the cost of health and the state of health between the U.S. and other wealthy nations.

Science for the Public Lecture Series: What’s Up at the 2015 Large Hadron Collider

In this presentation Dr. Bose explains how the collider works and what the collisions produce. The 2010-2012 run brought confirmation of the long-sought Higgs boson. This time, with nearly double the collision energy (13 TeV) scientists anticipate some entirely new discoveries.

Science for the Public Lecture Series: What’s Up at the 2015 Large Hadron Collider

In this presentation Dr. Bose explains how the collider works and what the collisions produce. The 2010-2012 run brought confirmation of the long-sought Higgs boson. This time, with nearly double the collision energy (13 TeV) scientists anticipate some entirely new discoveries.

Science for the Public: The Health-Environment Lecture Series: From Cell to Cancer

Despite decades of research, there is still uncertainty about the biological mechanism that triggers cancer. There are several rival hypotheses, and genuine progress in cancer research will depend on determining the correct one. In this presentation, Drs. Soto and Sonnenschein explain the major cancer theories and how the differences impact research.

Public Science: Origami: Art and Science

Origami is not limited to art. In this lecture, Dr. Mahadevan explains the geometrical basis of origami and how origami is widespread in structures throughout nature. He also shows the recent applications of origami in engineering and technology.

Public Science Lecture Series: The Dark Age of the Universe

In this lecture, Dr. Greenhill describes the period of the early universe called the "Dark Age." The universe had become transparent, but there was no visible light because. By probing this era with radio telescopes astronomers have recently begun to test theories about this mysterious era, when stars and galaxies were just forming.

Public Science Lecture Series: Energy Revolution

The U.S. wastes two-thirds of its energy, including 80 percent of the energy used in transportation. As Dr. Prentiss demonstrates in her book, Energy Revolution: The Physics and Promise of Efficient Energy Harvard Press: 2015), conversion to wind and solar power could generate 100 percent of the United States average total energy demand for the foreseeable future. She discusses how these technologies work and how they can be phased in quickly.

Public Science Lectures: Title: Viruses: Threats in a Tiny Package

From Ebola to MERS and SARS, familiar and previously unknown viruses are migrating across borders and around the globe in our highly connected world. The emergence of new viral diseases underscores humanity’s continuing vulnerability. How different viruses are transmitted, how infections are recognized and how outbreaks can be contained are the concerns of the John Connor Lab at Boston University. Dr. Connor explains virus infections and how medical research and new technologies are working to control the health threat of viruses.

Public Science: Origami: Art and Science

Origami is not limited to art. In this lecture, Dr. Mahadevan explains the geometrical basis of origami and how origami is widespread in structures throughout nature. He also shows the recent applications of origami in engineering and technology.

Public Science Lecture Series: The Dark Age of the Universe

In this lecture, Dr. Greenhill describes the period of the early universe called the "Dark Age." The universe had become transparent, but there was no visible light because. By probing this era with radio telescopes astronomers have recently begun to test theories about this mysterious era, when stars and galaxies were just forming.

Public Science Lecture Series: Energy Revolution

The U.S. wastes two-thirds of its energy, including 80 percent of the energy used in transportation. As Dr. Prentiss demonstrates in her book, Energy Revolution: The Physics and Promise of Efficient Energy Harvard Press: 2015), conversion to wind and solar power could generate 100 percent of the United States average total energy demand for the foreseeable future. She discusses how these technologies work and how they can be phased in quickly.

Public Science Lectures: Title: Viruses: Threats in a Tiny Package

From Ebola to MERS and SARS, familiar and previously unknown viruses are migrating across borders and around the globe in our highly connected world. The emergence of new viral diseases underscores humanity’s continuing vulnerability. How different viruses are transmitted, how infections are recognized and how outbreaks can be contained are the concerns of the John Connor Lab at Boston University. Dr. Connor explains virus infections and how medical research and new technologies are working to control the health threat of viruses.

Science for the Public: The Health-Environment Lecture Series: From Cell to Cancer

Despite decades of research, there is still uncertainty about the biological mechanism that triggers cancer. There are several rival hypotheses, and genuine progress in cancer research will depend on determining the correct one. In this presentation, Drs. Soto and Sonnenschein explain the major cancer theories and how the differences impact research.